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In conjunction with Hakikazi Catalyst, REPOA and TGNP, Policy Forum has published the long-awaited Public Expenditure Tracking System (PETS) Manual. Copies both in English (1000) and Swahili (1000) are available at our offices for collection. For our up-country members, please let us know how many copies you need so that we can arrange to send them via post. Otherwise, we’ll include one copy in English and another in Swahili in the next regular member info pack we send out.

Both the English and Swahili online versions in PDF can be accessed by clicking here

For further queries, please contact us on info@policyforum.or.tz


10/03/2008 - 3:34am
12/03/2008 - 10:34am
City: Dar es Salaam
Location within the city: To be confirmed

REPOA invites members of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) involved in policy processes such as planning, monitoring and evaluation and advocacy to a training workshop on Budget Analysis. This workshop will enhance the capacity of CSOs to analyse and understand the Budget and the Government’s processes that impact on the allocation and utilisation of resources.

The Budget is an important instrument in operationalizing the Government’s priorities and commitments. It is vital therefore, that as one of the key stakeholders, CSOs understand the Budget process so as to effectively participate in, and inform the process. The knowledge and skills gained from this course will help the CSOs play a more effective role in working with the Government of Tanzania to strengthen the planning and budgetary systems at all levels of government.

Workshop Content
The workshop will cover the following topics:

•    Understanding the Budget framework – revenue and expenditure
•    Planning and budget processes at the national and council level and the linkages
•    The execution of plans and budgets and the entry points for CSOs
•    Methods and tools for analyzing and monitoring the Budget – PERs, PET studies
•    The Budget and links to MKUKUTA’s goals and targets
•    Using the Tanzania Governance Noticeboard TGN and the Tanzania Socio-Economic Database TSED (hyperlink to www.tsed.org) to access and analyse budget data (e.g. tracking trends overtime, tracking trends across sectors, local government authorities, etc).

Course Details and How to Apply
The training will be held in Dar es Salaam from 10th – 12th March.
Participants will be sponsored for their travel and/or accommodation and there are no course fees.

Applicants should submit to REPOA:
- A typed application, including a description of the main activities of the CSO, and the applicant’s duties for that organisation

-  Fax, telephone and email contact details

- A detailed curriculum vitae, including a photocopy of the applicant’s diploma/degree certificate

The closing date for applications is February 15th

REPOA will notify the successful applicants by March 1st
It is regretted that due to time constraints we will only be able to respond to those who have been successful with their application.

 

On the 26th and 27th of November 2007, Policy Forum's Local Government Working Group in conjunction with the Leadership Forum Workshop organised a workshop on the Future of Local Government Reform Programme that took place in in Kibaha Town. The main objective which was to give PMO-RALG officials an opportunity to report to members of civil society the status of the current Local Government Reform Programme’s progress and to allow CSOs present at the event to make recommendations for the next programme (2008 – 2013).

 

Below is a Preliminary Report of the workshop.

Attachment Size
LGRP-CSO meeting: Preliminary Report 164.46 KB

 

 

On the 26th and 27th of November 2007, Policy Forum's Local Government Working Group in conjunction with the Leadership Forum Workshop organised a workshop on the Future of Local Government Reform Programme that took place in in Kibaha Town. The main objective which was to give PMO-RALG officials an opportunity to report to members of civil society the status of the current Local Government Reform Programme’s progress and to allow CSOs present at the event to make recommendations for the next programme (2008 – 2013).

 

Below is a Preliminary Report of the workshop.

Attachment Size
LGRP-CSO meeting: Preliminary Report 164.46 KB

 

On the 26th and 27th of November 2007, Policy Forum's Local Government Working Group in conjunction with the Leadership Forum Workshop organised a workshop on the Future of Local Government Reform Programme that took place in in Kibaha Town. The main objective which was to give PMO-RALG officials an opportunity to report to members of civil society the status of the current Local Government Reform Programme’s progress and to allow CSOs present at the event to make recommendations for the next programme (2008 – 2013).

Below is a Preliminary Report of the workshop.

This is to inform you of the logistics of the workshop in Kibaha on 26-27 Nov.2007.
 
Tea and lunch will be served at Njuweni Hotel during the two days workshop. A token transport allowance of Tshs.20,000/= will be
given to Dar es salaam participants daily and a Per Diem of Tshs. 50,000/= for upcountry participants will be given for 3 days.
 
We are looking forward to your continued good cooperation during the workshop.
 
Hebron Mwakagenda
Co-Convenor LGWG

This is to inform you of the logistics of the workshop in Kibaha on 26-27 Nov.2007.

 
Tea and lunch will be served at Njuweni Hotel during the two days workshop. A token transport allowance of Tshs.20,000/= will be
given to Dar es salaam participants daily and a Per Diem of Tshs. 50,000/= for upcountry participants will be given for 3 days.
 
We are looking forward to your continued good cooperation during the workshop.
 
Hebron Mwakagenda
Co-Convenor LGWG

 

Over the past decade, civil society organizations (CSOs) in more than 60 countries have initiated activities to analyze their governments’ budgets. Initially, CSOs specialized in budget analysis and advocacy to influence national budget policy. However, as a broader range of CSOs undertake budget work, the scope of this work has expanded to include activities throughout the budget process, including budget implementation and assessing the impact of expenditures. 

East Africa in particular has experienced an enormous growth in new and innovative “expenditure tracking” exercises (as grassroots budget monitoring is popularly termed). A common theme linking the work of organizations in this region is that they monitor government expenditures within local communities.Importantly, while each of these groups uses a different methodology and format in their monitoring activities – the methodologies and formats are sufficiently similar to allow lessons learned to be shared among these groups.

In October 2007, IBP and the Policy Forum of Tanzania organized an East Africa Expenditure Tracking Conference sponsored by a grant from the Open Society Initiative of East Africa (OSIEA). Held in Arusha, Tanzania, the conference was attended by 23 participants from 15 organizations from Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Malawi. Two observers from the Poverty Action Network of Civil Society in Ethiopia (PANE), an IBP partner, also attended to learn about methodologies for implementing expenditure tracking in Ethiopia.The three-day conference provided a forum for peer-learning and for exploring opportunities to strengthen and expand expenditure tracking work in East Africa through a regional network.

The first part of the conference involved joint-learning among peers, where groups from each country presented case studies of their expenditure tracking work, with a focus on methodology, access to information, challenges, and results. The conference also included a site visit to a nearby village to observe the results of the PIMA Card methodology developed and implemented by Hakikazi Catalyst, an Arusha-based NGO. During the site visit, participants met with members of the village monitoring committee, who presented the results of their monitoring activities, and also observed a community notice board (constructed by Hakikazi) where information on village governance, development projects, and finances are posted.

Following the presentations and site visit, participants from each organization got together to discuss what they could do differently in their work, what they would encourage others to consider, and two key lessons learned from the different methodologies presented.

Several groups, including the Centre for Democracy and Good Governance (CEDGG) and the Youth Agenda of Kenya, found the community notice boards useful and expressed an interest in adopting this tool in their work. The Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) of Uganda and CEDGG noted that they would like to take up aspects of Hakikazi’s PIMA Card methodology in their expenditure monitoring work.

The Uganda Debt Network (UDN) presented their work on monitoring the Schools Facilities Grant using community-based monitors, community radio, sub-county and district dialogues with local officials, and advocacy with national-level stakeholders. Inspired by UDN’s advocacy work, the Apac Anti-Corruption Coalition (TAACC) of Uganda and Muslims for Human Rights (MUHURI) of Kenya recognized that they need to strengthen linkages upwards and downwards to ensure that the impact of their work is felt at the national level. The Youth Agenda liked UDN’s use of community radio and will consider incorporating it into their media strategy.

After learning about the expenditure tracking guide for trainers, “Follow the Money”, produced by several of the Tanzanian groups (Hakikazi, REPOA and TGNP), TAACC and Youth Action Volunteers (YAV) identified strengthening documentation, dissemination, and sharing of best practices as an area in which they could improve their work.

Other groups, particularly the Civil Society Coalition on Quality Basic Education (CSCQBE) of Malawi and TAACC of Uganda, emphasized that monitoring work requires consistent use of evidence-based advocacy to bring about change. TAACC also pointed out the necessity of taking action to enforce accountability through prosecution and legal redress. In their presentation, TAACC highlighted their success in using the courts to recover public funds and remove corrupt public officials, particularly in the case of Universal Primary Education funds in northern Uganda.

When asked what they would do differently in their work, KRC and the Youth Agenda responded that they could improve the use of tracking tools which monitor both expenditures and quality of services, which is a component of methodologies used by groups such as Hakikazi, UDN, and YAV.

Following the presentations by CSCQBE on tracking of education expenditures and by YAV on health budget tracking, CEDGG and the Youth Agenda expressed interest in exploring sector-focused monitoring work.

A majority of the groups, including UDN, Kivulini (representing the Mwanza Policy Initiative), Hakikazi, Youth Agenda, KRC, and YAV, also stressed that the role of CSOs is to facilitate communities to undertake their own monitoring work, and to empower them to articulate their own concerns and engage with government and decision-making processes.

During the last session of the conference, Policy Forum presented their experience of coordinating a national network in Tanzania and the challenges involved. One key challenge noted was getting member organizations to hold joint-learning events, rather than just conducting trainings in their own organizations. After this presentation, participants gathered in their country groups to discuss establishing an East Africa expenditure tracking network, followed by a plenary session. Participants agreed that a network is needed to address common challenges, facilitate joint learning, and strengthen and expand tracking work in the region. It was generally decided that the development of the network should be gradual and should start by focusing on an issue common to all three countries. IBP is currently following up with all of the participants to discuss next steps and focus issues for the network and possible activities to be held in the coming year.

 

Story Courtesy of IBP Newsletter

 

Over the past decade, civil society organizations (CSOs) in more than 60 countries have initiated activities to analyze their governments’ budgets. Initially, CSOs specialized in budget analysis and advocacy to influence national budget policy. However, as a broader range of CSOs undertake budget work, the scope of this work has expanded to include activities throughout the budget process, including budget implementation and assessing the impact of expenditures. 

East Africa in particular has experienced an enormous growth in new and innovative “expenditure tracking” exercises (as grassroots budget monitoring is popularly termed). A common theme linking the work of organizations in this region is that they monitor government expenditures within local communities.Importantly, while each of these groups uses a different methodology and format in their monitoring activities – the methodologies and formats are sufficiently similar to allow lessons learned to be shared among these groups.

In October 2007, IBP and the Policy Forum of Tanzania organized an East Africa Expenditure Tracking Conference sponsored by a grant from the Open Society Initiative of East Africa (OSIEA). Held in Arusha, Tanzania, the conference was attended by 23 participants from 15 organizations from Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Malawi. Two observers from the Poverty Action Network of Civil Society in Ethiopia (PANE), an IBP partner, also attended to learn about methodologies for implementing expenditure tracking in Ethiopia.The three-day conference provided a forum for peer-learning and for exploring opportunities to strengthen and expand expenditure tracking work in East Africa through a regional network.

The first part of the conference involved joint-learning among peers, where groups from each country presented case studies of their expenditure tracking work, with a focus on methodology, access to information, challenges, and results. The conference also included a site visit to a nearby village to observe the results of the PIMA Card methodology developed and implemented by Hakikazi Catalyst, an Arusha-based NGO. During the site visit, participants met with members of the village monitoring committee, who presented the results of their monitoring activities, and also observed a community notice board (constructed by Hakikazi) where information on village governance, development projects, and finances are posted.

Following the presentations and site visit, participants from each organization got together to discuss what they could do differently in their work, what they would encourage others to consider, and two key lessons learned from the different methodologies presented.

Several groups, including the Centre for Democracy and Good Governance (CEDGG) and the Youth Agenda of Kenya, found the community notice boards useful and expressed an interest in adopting this tool in their work. The Kabarole Research and Resource Centre (KRC) of Uganda and CEDGG noted that they would like to take up aspects of Hakikazi’s PIMA Card methodology in their expenditure monitoring work.

The Uganda Debt Network (UDN) presented their work on monitoring the Schools Facilities Grant using community-based monitors, community radio, sub-county and district dialogues with local officials, and advocacy with national-level stakeholders. Inspired by UDN’s advocacy work, the Apac Anti-Corruption Coalition (TAACC) of Uganda and Muslims for Human Rights (MUHURI) of Kenya recognized that they need to strengthen linkages upwards and downwards to ensure that the impact of their work is felt at the national level. The Youth Agenda liked UDN’s use of community radio and will consider incorporating it into their media strategy.

After learning about the expenditure tracking guide for trainers, “Follow the Money”, produced by several of the Tanzanian groups (Hakikazi, REPOA and TGNP), TAACC and Youth Action Volunteers (YAV) identified strengthening documentation, dissemination, and sharing of best practices as an area in which they could improve their work.

Other groups, particularly the Civil Society Coalition on Quality Basic Education (CSCQBE) of Malawi and TAACC of Uganda, emphasized that monitoring work requires consistent use of evidence-based advocacy to bring about change. TAACC also pointed out the necessity of taking action to enforce accountability through prosecution and legal redress. In their presentation, TAACC highlighted their success in using the courts to recover public funds and remove corrupt public officials, particularly in the case of Universal Primary Education funds in northern Uganda.

When asked what they would do differently in their work, KRC and the Youth Agenda responded that they could improve the use of tracking tools which monitor both expenditures and quality of services, which is a component of methodologies used by groups such as Hakikazi, UDN, and YAV.

Following the presentations by CSCQBE on tracking of education expenditures and by YAV on health budget tracking, CEDGG and the Youth Agenda expressed interest in exploring sector-focused monitoring work.

A majority of the groups, including UDN, Kivulini (representing the Mwanza Policy Initiative), Hakikazi, Youth Agenda, KRC, and YAV, also stressed that the role of CSOs is to facilitate communities to undertake their own monitoring work, and to empower them to articulate their own concerns and engage with government and decision-making processes.

During the last session of the conference, Policy Forum presented their experience of coordinating a national network in Tanzania and the challenges involved. One key challenge noted was getting member organizations to hold joint-learning events, rather than just conducting trainings in their own organizations. After this presentation, participants gathered in their country groups to discuss establishing an East Africa expenditure tracking network, followed by a plenary session. Participants agreed that a network is needed to address common challenges, facilitate joint learning, and strengthen and expand tracking work in the region. It was generally decided that the development of the network should be gradual and should start by focusing on an issue common to all three countries. IBP is currently following up with all of the participants to discuss next steps and focus issues for the network and possible activities to be held in the coming year.

 

Story Courtesy of IBP Newsletter

Below are the 4 pre-Budget Briefs for the financial year 2007/08

Attachment Size
Social Sectors brief.pdf 278.31 KB
Quick Wins brief.pdf 1.02 MB
Governance brief.pdf 278.6 KB
Long summary brief.pdf 333.31 KB

 

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